Skip to main content
Default Image

America’s Next Wave of Student Protests Takes Aim at Capitalism

Since most young people under the age of 50 favor socialism over capitalism, it should come as no surprise that this cultural change is manifesting at universities. This article highlights some of the major movements currently taking place at universities, including the Next System Project Teach-Ins, to be held nationwide in Spring 2016.

In 2016, an entirely new wave of campus activism is hitting schools in the form of teach-ins, chiefly focused on finding a way to move beyond capitalism as the dominant socioeconomic system in the United States.

“Growing up, we were taught that there were only two choices for an economic system: state socialism or unfettered capitalism, which is false,” said Dana Brown, coordinator of the Next System Project‘s teach-ins. “But there has yet to be a national discussion about what comes after our current system and how we get there. We believe college campuses are the best place to begin that conversation.”

Read the full article here.

Publication date: 2015-12-06
Parent publication: U.S. Uncut
Publication URL: http://usuncut.com/resistance/next-wave-student-protests-takes-aim-capitalism/

More related work

Default Image

Healthcare as a public service: Redesigning U.S. healthcare with health and equity at the center

The Veterans Health Administration—the country’s only fully public, integrated healthcare system—has a lot to tell us about how a national healthcare service for the United States might operate.

read more
Default Image

Preston is putting socialist policies into practice

Labor movements must pursue a social and economic vision that can address the deep structural inequalities these pandemic years have exposed. Preston gives a glimpse of the exciting possibilities that collaboration with unions could achieve.

read more
Default Image

This must be the year of climate action—we've wasted so many

The climate issue has grown too large and devastating to ignore. We need the demand for action raised to the highest decibel our civil society can generate.

read more