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Ashland Area Explores Development Alternatives

Our Manager of Community Development Programs was interviewed on Wisconsin Public Radio as she travelled to Wisconsin to spread knowledge on economic development alternatives and empowerment programs based on equality and place-based cultural consciousness:

“Over and over again, you’ve seen corporations and big companies that have been our major job creators leaving communities and leaving behind cities and towns where there are then no jobs and there’s infrastructure built up to support those jobs that is now crumbling,” said McKinley, who co-authored the 2015 report “Cities Building Community Wealth.”

 

Cities can create more sustainable economies by connecting government and business with local suppliers that are rooted in place through broadly held and locally held ownership and supported by institutions and ecosystems that ultimately lead to positive changes for communities, particularly communities that have missed out on economic growth, McKinley said.

Read full article and hear the interview.

Publication date: 2016-06-21
Parent publication: Wisconsin Public Radio
Publication URL: http://www.wpr.org/ashland-area-explores-development-alternatives

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