Skip to main content
Default Image

Before Big Pharma Kills Us, Maybe Public Pharma Can Save Us

Dana Brown deputy director of the Next System Project writes for The American Prospect: “Before Big Pharma Kills Us, Maybe Public Pharma Can Save Us.” In this article, Brown writes about the need for public funded medical research:
 

The increasing threat of superbugs arises in large part because antibiotic resistance is growing while the development of new antibiotics is on the decline. Antibiotic research and development (R&D) activity by Big Pharma has been falling for decades, grinding to an almost complete halt in the 2000s before pressure from governments and public health authorities led to a slight uptick in the development of new antibiotics. 

The reason is simple: markets don’t incentivize innovation in an area like antibiotics where there’s little money to be made. The very nature of antibiotics works against free market motivations. Because they are intended to be taken for short periods of time, and are often curative, antibiotics are not nearly as profitable as medications developed to treat chronic disease like diabetes or heart disease. They also tend to be priced lower than many other drugs. This all adds up to mean that antibiotic development has a very slow return on investment.

Read more in The American Prospect.

 

Publication date: 2018-08-26
Parent publication: The American Prospect
Publication URL: Before Big Pharma Kills Us, Maybe Public Pharma Can Save Us

More related work

Default Image

The Democracy Collaborative and The Democracy Collaborative Workers' Union agree to fair severance package for laid-off staff

TDC and union members have agreed to a package of protections that goes well beyond the baseline severance provisions for layoffs agreed to in TDC’s union contract.

read more
Default Image

HAN Anchoring Resilience: Aligning Supply Chains and Impact Purchasing for Community Health summit

Today the Healthcare Anchor Network (HAN) convened the Anchoring Resilience: Aligning Supply Chains and Impact Purchasing for Community Health summit to catalyze the conversation around how the healthcare sector could collaborate to more intentionally onshore and localize production of PPE and other important supplies with emphasis on equity, sustainability, and supply chain resilience. HAN released a white paper “Reimagining Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Supply Chains” that calls for national leadership and healthcare sector collaboration to create PPE production capacity for American sourced and manufactured supplies.

read more
Default Image

Reimagining Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Supply Chains

The Democracy Collaborative prepared a report, created for the Healthcare Anchor Network, which details the current status of the supply chain of PPE, the market shifts caused by COVID-19, and the potential solutions to ensure capacity within US health systems for the future.

read more