Skip to main content
Marketplace-American-Public-Media-APM-Logo-Design-Identity-Little.jpg

Can co-ops remake America's economy from the ground up?

Federal Reserve policymakers have generally relied on tweaking interest rates as a strategy for jump staring the economy. But in a country where wages adjusted for inflation have been stuck in place for almost a decade, some scholars think the economy needs a more aggressive overhaul.

Gar Alperovitz is a political economist and historian. His new book, called “What Then Must We Do: Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution”, details systemic changes for the economy. He says co-ops are key to the nation’s recovery.

“Most people don’t realize that changing the ownership of wealth means one person, one vote — that’s what a co-op is. 130 million Americans are already members of co-ops. They are all over the country and people just don’t notice them,” he says. “It’s a different, very American, down-home way to begin looking at democratizing ownership, starting at the bottom and working up from the grassroots.”

Publication date: 2013-06-17
Parent publication: Marketplace
Publication URL: http://www.marketplace.org/topics/economy/can-co-ops-remake-americas-economy-ground

More related work

Default Image

Healthcare as a public service: Redesigning U.S. healthcare with health and equity at the center

The Veterans Health Administration—the country’s only fully public, integrated healthcare system—has a lot to tell us about how a national healthcare service for the United States might operate.

read more
Default Image

Preston is putting socialist policies into practice

Labor movements must pursue a social and economic vision that can address the deep structural inequalities these pandemic years have exposed. Preston gives a glimpse of the exciting possibilities that collaboration with unions could achieve.

read more
Default Image

This must be the year of climate action—we've wasted so many

The climate issue has grown too large and devastating to ignore. We need the demand for action raised to the highest decibel our civil society can generate.

read more