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Energy democracy: Goals and policy instruments for sociotechnical transitions

Transitioning to ecological sustainability Expanding democratic ownership

Matthew J. Burke explores just economic transitions and long-term strategies for energy democracy in the journal Energy Research & Social Science. In his article, Burke highlights the thought leadership and guidance of the Democracy Collaborative: 

Energy democracy is an emergent social movement advancing renewable energy transitions by resisting the fossil-fuel-dominant energy agenda while reclaiming and democratically restructuring energy regimes. By integrating technological change with the potential for socioeconomic and political change, the movement links social justice and equity with energy innovation. Through a policy mix lens, this research examines the energy democracy agenda in the United States to understand how and to what extent the mix of policy instruments currently proposed among energy democracy advocates corresponds to the overarching goals of the movement.

Read more in Energy Research & Social Science.

 

Publication date: 2017-11-16
Parent publication: Science direct
Publication URL: Energy democracy: Goals and policy instruments for sociotechnical transitions

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