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Growth for Growth's Sake Will Kill Us All

Democracy Collaborative co-founder Gar Alperovitz discusses the contradiction between unending economic growth and ecological sustainability.

One economic fact is held to be self-evident: that the future well-being of the United States requires economic growth — preferably, as much of it as we can muster. Despite wildly divergent policy recommendations, this basic assumption is made clear and explicit by everyone from the fiscally conservative Club for Growth to the left-leaning Center for American Progress. In the boardroom of the Federal Reserve, at the negotiating table for the Trans-Pacific Partnership and on the shale fields of North Dakota, our national economic policy is built on the unshakable conviction that the only way to grow the middle class is to grow the economy — by any means necessary.

Aside from the fact that the top 1 percent has taken most of the gains of growth, leaving the rest of society in virtual stalemate for three decades, there is a profound problem with this solution. Indeed, it’s time to face an ecological truth that makes the traditional assumption increasingly untenable, as unpopular and difficult as this conclusion might be: Growth isn’t always possible. Nor is it necessarily desirable.

Read more in Al Jazeera America.

Publication date: 2014-04-10
Parent publication: Al Jazeera America
Publication URL: http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2014/4/economic-growth-climatechangeinequalityneweconomy.html
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