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How Communities Can Build Wealth by Knocking on Doors

Expanding democratic ownership Centering community and place

In Next City, Oscar Perry Abello looks at how our new report Educate and Empower highlights key strategies for building stronger community wealth building initiatives.

“’People know that there are door-knocking campaigns and community organizers do it all the time, but have they thought of this consciously as a tool for economic development,’ explains Keane Bhatt, senior associate for policy and strategy at the Democracy Collaborative, based in Takoma Park, Maryland. Bhatt is co-author of Educate and Empower: Tools for Building Community Wealth, a report released today that features profiles of 11 organizations including PUSH Buffalo.

“ ‘What we’ve done is go around to 11 different community-wealth building institutions to try to seek out from a broad diversity of initiatives some kind of underlying themes that are crosscutting in nature,’ Bhatt says.”

Read the rest at Next City.

 

 

Publication date: 2015-08-07
Parent publication: Next City
Publication URL: https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/strategies-for-community-driven-wealth-building-democracy-collaborative

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