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John Maynard Keynes died 70 years ago. We ignore his wisdom at our peril

This article from The Guardian pays homage to the warnings voiced by economist John Maynard Keynes about the dangers of a global capitalist system, mentioning the work of The Next System Project:

So what might a Bretton Woods for the 21st century look like? Is it possible to design an economic gathering that prioritizes the design of frameworks to advance the interests of people and the planet? It’s not only necessary – it’s increasingly possible.

The Next System Project, a network of hundreds of creative thinkers and activists, is putting forward actionable blueprints for the new economy, from old post-industrial cities to rural agricultural communities. Leaders of that movement, including Gar Alperovitz, Ai-jen Poo, Medea Benjamin, Danny Glover, the congressman John Conyers, Sarita Gupta, Daniel Ellsberg and others, have been working to compile something as comprehensive as the framework the world got in 1944… Read full article.

Publication date: 2016-04-20
Parent publication: The Guardian
Publication URL: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/21/john-maynard-keynes-capitalism-us-economy

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