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Obama’s Visit Raises Ghosts of Hiroshima

Our co-founder Gar Alperovitz has been a leader of the conversation about the atrocities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki for decades. Here, he is cited by New York Times journalist David Sanger for his evidence that dropping the bomb was an unnecessary part of the Japanese surrender and the end of World War II:

“The top American military leaders who fought World War II, much to the surprise of many who are not aware of the record, were quite clear that the atomic bomb was unnecessary, that Japan was on the verge of surrender, and — for many — that the destruction of large numbers of civilians was immoral,” Gar Alperovitz, a leader of the movement to revise the United States’ own historical accounting, wrote last year in The Nation… Read full article.

Publication date: 2016-05-09
Parent publication: The New York Times
Publication URL: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/11/world/asia/hiroshima-atomic-bomb.html?_r=0

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