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The War Was Won Before Hiroshima—And the Generals Who Dropped the Bomb Knew It

Gar Alperovitz writes for The Nation on the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing in 1945, and asks “Will Americans face the brutal truth?”

History is rarely simple, and confronting it head-on, with critical honesty, is often quite painful. Myths, no matter how oversimplified or blatantly false, are too often far more likely to be embraced than inconvenient and unsettling truths. Even now, for instance, we see how difficult it is for the average US citizen to come to terms with the brutal record of slavery and white supremacy that underlies so much of our national story. Remaking our popular understanding of the “good” war’s climactic act is likely to be just as hard. But if the Confederate battle flag can come down in South Carolina, we can perhaps one day begin to ask ourselves more challenging questions about the nature of America’s global power, and what is true and what is false about why we really dropped the atomic bomb on Japan. 

Read the rest at The Nation.

Publication date: 2015-08-05
Parent publication: The Nation
Publication URL: The War Was Won Before Hiroshima—And the Generals Who Dropped the Bomb Knew It

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