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Where next for the New Economy movement?

Eli Feghali writes in Open Democracy on ‘where next for the New Economy movement?’ In this article, Feghali highlights the work of the Democracy Collaborative with the Preston Model:  

These policy victories could be a sign of the mass appeal of new economy values and ideas. That certainly seems to be the case in parts of UK politics, where the Labour party has adopted policies and narratives about democratizing the economy in their national party platform. This development was inspired in part by the success of the “Preston model”—an economic development framework which gives priority to building an ecosystem of institutions that work together to build and circulate wealth within the community. This model (named after the city of Preston where it’s been tested since around 2013) was itself inspired by a US experiment, the Evergreen Cooperatives in Cleveland, Ohio, a network of worker cooperatives financed and supported by anchor institutions like hospitals and schools in the community.

Read more in Open Democracy

Publication date: 2018-07-16
Parent publication: Open Democracy
Publication URL: Where next for the New Economy movement?

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