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Workplace Solidarity in the Equitable Economy

Jane Paul, writes in Dollars and Sense, aboutWorkplace Solidarity in the Equitable Economy.” In this article, Paul quotes The Democracy Collaborative communication director John Duda on a cooperative support system: 

[…] The Southern California region has a worker-ownership network that is held together not by a single entity but by a polycentric system. A vibrant support network of cooperative developers, supporters in the labor movement, worker- and community-based organizations, time banks, and legal and financial advisors all contribute. As John Duda of the Democracy Collaborative, an alternative economics research and development institute, stated: “A networked eco-system—decentralized and resilient—can harness energy and interest at different levels and in different sectors.“ The LA network uses connections to peers in social justice and economic development to create a space where people can grow and learn from one another. It is grounded in personal relationships, relies on volunteers, and is anchored by established nonprofits. […]

Read more in Dollar and Sense

Publication date: 2018-06-30
Parent publication: Dollar and Sense
Publication URL: Workplace Solidarity in the Equitable Economy

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